Bull–Randall Family Genealogy Wiki

Walter Clarke Randall

Son of Walter Baxter "Dub" Randall and Sara Ann Clarke, Walter Clarke Randall, known to friends and family as “Clarke”, was born in Franklin County, Georgia on December 1, 1934.

Clarke grew up in Lavonia Georgia spending much of his time with his Uncle, Byron Clarke, near Gum Log, GA. He recalls that when he was 5 years old, he would often walk (by himself) to a near-by “Service Station”, where he would get an RC Cola and a pack of peanuts (on credit), and then on to the movie theater in Lavonia (about 5 or 6 blocks from his home) because children under 6 years old could watch movies for free. Clarke would pour the pack of peanuts into the RC Cola, to free one hand, so that he could take both RC Cola and peanuts into his mouth at once - chew the peanuts, and then swallow both. This remained one of his favorite “snacks” well into his adult years. At about this same time, Clarke would have Sunday lunch with his great-grandfather, Jesse Thomas Jackson Clarke, and great-grandmother, Sallie Tallulah Adams Clarke (known to the grandchildren as “Mama Clarke”), where he also recalled that he and his Uncle Byron would often go out into the “smoke house” (where ham was curing) and eat the hanging raw “salt cured” ham. The family would typically kept 2 hogs, and would kill 1 hog each year. The ham was “salt cured” in a bag hanging in what they called the “smoke house”, although they never actually “smoked” the ham. The beacon & fatback were kept in a “salt box”. It was also during this time that Clarke recalled traveling one day with his great grandfather, Jesse Thomas Jackson Clarke, in a Ford “Model T” car to Toccoa to sell pecans. Jesse Thomas Jackson Clarke never drove a car, and Clarke could not recall who drove them.

During World War II, Byron Clarke was drafted and stationed in the Pacific theater fighting the Japanese. While Byron was away, Clarke slept almost every night across the street from his home at Gertrude Randall Clarke's house. Gertrude Randall Clarke was called “Mama Clarke”.

W.B. "Dub" Randall typically kept a total of 15 cattle (two of which were “milk” cows). As a child, Clarke recalled some of his chores including: churning the butter and milking 1 cow - while Sara Clarke Randall milked the other. Sara always milked the cow with the larger teats while Clarke milked the cow with the smaller teats - presumably because he had smaller hands. The family “sold” the butter to a local grocery store where the amount was recorded on a “Due Bill”. This allowed the family to buy groceries as a “debit” against the “Due Bill” rather than exchange cash. Clarke's chores also included carrying 5 gallon buckets of “slop” down to the “branch” (spring) for the hogs, soaking corn cobs in kerosene (used by his mother to quickly start the coal fire each morning). Among the crops the family grew were cotton, corn, and wheat / oats.

On occasion, the hogs were treated to a snake coming up through the spring into the pen. The hogs would enjoy pulling, tugging and throwing the snake into the air; before eventually eating it. This is reminiscent of the opening scene of the 1989 TV mini-series, “Lonesome Dove”, where several hogs are tearing a snake apart on the porch of a cabin occupied by Augustus 'Gus' McCrae (played by Robert Duvall).

During the spring months he would plow the fields with a mule (the family owned 3 mules); who responded to “Gee” (to turn right) and “Haw” (to turn left). During September, Clarke would help pick cotton (by hand) - where he would be paid the same as the other workers (usually contracted black folks), which was 2-3 cents per Lb. Once they had a wagon load, W.B. "Dub" Randall would take the cotton to a cotton gin (to sell) or to a warehouse (near the cotton gin) to store until the price went up (which it usually did by December).

In addition, Sara Randall kept a 1 acre garden, where she grew butter-beans, pinto beans, black-eyed peas and assorted vegetables. As the crops came in, she would “can” several vegetables and dry the beans and peas (for winter). While many people in the U.S. had to rely on rationed food during WW II, W.B. Randall's family ate well due to growing their own food.

Because few people had refrigerators, the family kept milk cool by lowering a sealed half gallon glass jar into the water well (located about 20 feet from the back porch) - and pulling it up when they wanted some (prior to W.B. "Dub" Randall having the well drilled, the family shared a water pipe with Gertrude Randall Clarke (who lived across the street - actually a dirt road). A favorite “quick” meal for the Randall family was to crumble cornbread into a glass, pour cold milk into the glass, place a slice of onion on the side, and then eat the cornbread with a spoon.

During World War II, Clarke received a BB Gun one year. Both he and Priscilla recall Clarke teasing her by shooting her in the butt with his BB Gun.

Life During World War II
No Domestic Cars, Auto Parts or Trucks Produced
Life in the U.S. changed drastically after Pearl Harbor. Raw materials like rubber, steel and nylon were used in the war effort. Beginning in early 1942, the production of most durable goods, such as domestic automobiles, auto parts, trucks, vacuum cleaners, and kitchen appliances, was banned until the war ended (late 1945). In addition, new housing was also banned. Due to rationing, most families were allocated 3 U.S. gallons of gasoline a week, which sharply curtailed driving for any purpose.

Nylon Stockings Rationed
Before WW II, almost every adult woman wore nylon stockings in public. During the war, nylon was rationed, so women would draw “seams” on the backs of their legs to make it appear they were wearing nylon stockings.

1943 Pennies Made From Steel
Due to wartime needs of copper for use in ammunition and other military equipment during World War II, the one-cent coin was minted in zinc-coated steel. This alloy caused the new coins to be magnetic and 13% lighter. However, problems began to arise from the mintage. Freshly minted, they were often mistaken for dimes. Magnets in vending machines (which took copper cents) placed to pick up steel slugs also picked up the legitimate steel cents. Because the galvanization process didn't cover the edges of the coins, sweat would quickly rust the metal. After public outcry, the Mint developed a process whereby salvaged brass shell casings were augmented with pure copper to produce an alloy close to the 1941–42 composition. This was used for 1944–46-dated cents, after which the prewar composition was resumed. Although they continued to circulate into the 1960s, the mint collected large numbers of the 1943 cents and destroyed them.

Hamburger Re-Named “Liberty Steak”
Fearing the word “hamburger” was somehow pro-Nazi, clever marketers changed its name to “Liberty Steak” for the duration of the war.

After WW II, a freezer locker was built in near-by Lavonia, GA (by the school). So the family began periodically slaughtering steers for meat. The meat was then taken to the local freezer locker, where it was stored until the family needed it.

At about age 10, Clarke would “swip” (aka “borrow without permission”), Carl Fay Smith's 12 gauge double barreled shotgun (which stayed at Gertrude Randall Clarke's house - across the street from from Clarke's home) and secretly go hunting (for rabbit, squirrel or quail) almost every afternoon (after school), with an Eskimo Spitz (named “Skippy”). Whatever he killed, he would give to his grandmother, Gertrude Randall Clarke, so that his parents wouldn't find out (as he was “swiping” the 12 gauge shotgun shells from W.B. "Dub" Randall). At about age 11, his parents gave him a “over/under shotgun / rifle combo (a .22 long on the top barrel with a .410 shotgun under barrel). He found this a little disappointing since he had grown accustomed to using a 12 gauge shotgun, but pretended to be surprised and happy with the gun. The following year he received a 16 gauge shotgun, but still preferred the 12 gauge. The next year he received the 12 gauge shotgun that he had wanted all along. Later, Clarke got a Bird Dog… but he later had to kill it because it had gotten into a chicken house.

For entertainment, the family would often visit Sara Sophia Felton Randall-Maret (Aunt Sophie) and her husband, Karl Eugene Maret, where the adults would play cards while the children all played. At home, W.B. "Dub" Randall had an “upright” radio in the living room where the family would gather. This was particularly popular during the winter, as this was where the coal burning heater was located. Because there was no other heat in the house, the temperature in Clarke's room was practically the same as it was outdoors. During the winter the family would warm bricks on the coal burning heater, then wrap them in towels and place them in their beds (under the quilts at the foot of the bed) for warmth. The beds were covered with several quilts. In fact, Sara Clarke Randall made quilts for many years.

After World War II, Clarke very happily received a heating pad… to replace the “warming bricks” in his bed!

Life After World War II

Halloween & Trick or Treating
After WW II, when Clarke was about 13 years old, he participated in a very new Halloween tradition called “Trick or Treating”. While widespread today, prior to the 1930's “Trick or Treating” did not exist! And not everyone embraced the idea of rewarding costumed kids “begging” for “treats”. Clarke recalled primarily “Trick or Treating” with other early teenage friends and visiting the homes of local teachers, who seemed to embrace the new practice of distributing candies to kids.

Common use of the Toothbrush
Prior to WW II, toothbrushes were made with bone, wood, or ivory handles using animal bristles (e.g., Pig bristles and Siberian boar hair bristles were both popular). This was not ideal because the animal bristles retained bacteria, did not dry well, and the bristles often fell out. Consequently, few people brushed their teeth!. The first nylon bristle toothbrush (manufactured by DuPont) went on sale on February 24, 1938. The use of nylon bristles allowed for simpler, cheaper mass-production of a toothbrush less likely to harbor and grow harmful bacteria than the traditional animal bristle brush. During WW II, the U.S. Military issued each soldier a toothbrush and required them to clean their teeth daily. It wasn't until after WW II, when returning U.S. soldiers brought this habit to their families, that brushing teeth became routine in the U.S.!

In fact, during the 1930's, Clarke remembers his father, Walter Baxter "Dub" Randall, cutting “green” twigs to use in cleaning his teeth. This was probably learned from his Father & Grandfather. Clarke didn't remember what, if anything, his mother (Sara Clarke Randall) used for teeth cleaning.

Cigarette Smoking Promoted as Healthy
In 1946, Camel cigarettes (named for the Turkish paper it used) began a major ad push showing doctors lighting up with the famous tagline, “More doctors smoke camels than any other cigarette.”

According to the U.S. National Library of Medicine, in reality, this “independent” surveying was conducted by R.J. Reynolds' ad agency, the William Esty Co., who would send staff to query physicians about their smoking habits at medical conferences and in their offices. They'd ask about their cigarette brand of choice, most of the time, after just having provided the good doctors with free cartons of Camels. The campaign lasted for eight years.

Both Walter Clarke Randall and his father, Walter Baxter "Dub" Randall, smoked cigarettes for a significant part of their adult lives. Clarke stopped smoking in 1990.

Shortly after WW II, approximately 1946, Gertrude Randall Clarke sold her house to W.B. "Dub" Randall, in order for her to by a duplex located a short distance away in Lavonia, Georgia. W.B. Randall's family never lived in Gertrudes house, but instead rented it to a Mr. Edgar Whitfield (who worked on W.B. Randall's farm - and had a large family).

Clarke Randall's High School Graduation photo (May 26, 1952). Clarke appears in the second row, third from left. His sister, Elizabeth Randall, is the child on the front row, left.

As a teenager, during summer evenings Clarke would often take a buddy to go “frog gigging” at the 1 acre pond that W.B. "Dub" Randall had built on the back part of his land (the building of which was funded by the government). The Pond was fed by a fresh water spring and was initially stocked with 1,000 brim and 500 bass (although Clarke recalled having caught only 1 or 2 bass and small brim). Armed with a frog gig, a .22 caliber rifle, and a shotgun, Clarke and his buddy would use flashlights to locate the frogs (as their eyes reflect the light at night). In addition to helping locate of frogs, shining a light in their eyes stuns or dazes the frogs, making it less likely for the frog to see an approaching hunter, or an incoming gig! Sometimes they would simply shoot a frog using the .22 caliber rifle. Unfortunately, the light (from the flashlights) attracts snakes at night. So the shotgun was used to kill any approaching snakes. After catching a satisfactory number of frogs, they would cut their hind legs off and them for Sara to fry in a skillet (throwing the frogs bodies out into the field). Clarke would tease his sisters watching the detached frogs legs “kick” while being cooked. In the morning, they would often see some frogs in the field that were still alive, attempting to crawl away using only their front legs (Clarke noted that frogs can be hard to kill).

1949 model D2050 Truetone 10” TV, from Western Auto Supply Co.

During the 1949-50 time frame, W.B. "Dub" Randall bought a TrueTone Television (from Western Auto Supply Co.), along with a four-stack antenna array, for the family to enjoy. At that time the ONLY television station that it would receive was WSB-TV in Atlanta, GA (WSB-TV began broadcasting on September 29, 1948, originally broadcasting on channel 8. It is the second-oldest station south of Washington, D.C., and was originally a primary NBC affiliate). Clarke's favorite TV show was “The Kate Smith Hour”, which appeared on NBC Television from 1950 through 1954, in the late afternoon hour of 4:00 p.m. ET.

After completing High School, Clarke attended “North Georgia College” (in 2012 it became the University of North Georgia), a four-year university located in Dahlonega, Georgia. It was, and remains (as of 2014), one of only six senior military colleges in the United States. Clarke attended for 5 quarters studying accounting (starting in the Fall of 1952). He dropped out of college after an altercation with the “Commandant” there. The “Commandant” accused Clarke of having a car… which students were not allowed to have. An offense that Clarke steadfastly denied, when the “Commandant” called Clarke a liar, Clarke responded “If there's a liar here, I'm looking at him. Clarke then transferred to the University of Georgia for one quarter. The “Commandant” later learned that the car in question actually belonged to a different cadet. However, no apology was ever offered by either party.

Military Service

Because work was difficult to find, that summer, Clarke and Brose “Tater” Hudson, Jr., went to Atlanta where they found work with a “wrecking” company (demolishing large houses and old mansions - typically using sledge hammers). After about 5 weeks, Clarke and Brose “Tater” Hudson, Jr. decided to volunteer for the Draft (as most young men were being Drafted at that time as the Korean War had just ended – through the “Korean Armistice Agreement” signed on July 27, 1953) and enlisted in the U.S. Army on August 12, 1954. After the first 8 weeks of basic – at Camp Gordon (now called Fort Gordon) – located in Augusta, GA, he went into Supply School for his MOS (the Army calls their enlisted jobs “Military Occupation Specialties”, or MOS) training in Fort Leonard Wood, MO for 8 weeks (Clarke said that this was primarily because he knew how to type. A rare skill among men at that time, he had taken “Typing” in High School as an “easy” course). He was then attached to S4 of the 265th Field Artillery Battalion and deployed to Baumholder, Germany (as this was during the “Cold War”) where he achieved the rank of Specialist Grade SP3 - Corporal. Clarke spent 18 months in Germany, during which time he bought a car. That allowed him (and his buddies) to visit the Swiss Alps, the Italian Riviera, Holland (2 or 3 times), Paris (2 or 3 times) and Spain (his favorite). Clarke was discharged from active duty on July 28, 1956 (at Fort Jackson, SC). However, he was placed into the U.S. Army “active” reserves for 2 more years, followed by four more years in “inactive” reserves.

Marriage

He moved back to Georgia in August 1956, and began working at WABCO (Westinghouse Airbrake, Co. – Owned by American Standard) in Toccoa, GA. Clarke worked in the Cost Accounting Dept. – where he met Shirley Patricia “Patt” Ann Brady, who worked in the “Transportation” Dept.

Clarke Randall (at age 22) married Shirley Patricia “Patt” Ann Brady (age 19) on October 18, 1957. Initially living in a 2-story apartment building, they both worked at WABCO until the following year, when “Patt” was “laid-off”. Clarke then quit so that he could work at “Brady Welding” (owned by by his father-in-law, Ernest Brady) performing cost accounting and welding. They then moved into a 1 bedroom, 1 bath room, house above the Welding shop (owned by Ernest Brady).

Walter Clarke Randall and Shirley Patricia “Patt” Ann Brady had two sons:

  1. Richard Clarke Randall (b. January 17, 1959)
  2. Walter Mark Randall (b. August 26, 1963)

Patt's father, Ernest Brady, gave the couple a plot of land located 1 block away from the welding shop. Clarke designed and had a house built upon the land - sitting atop a hill overlooking the house that Ernest and Irene Brady lived in at that time. In January, 1964 (shortly after Walter Mark Randall was born), they moved into the new house, located at: 158 Patsy Drive, Toccoa, Georgia 30577.

Every Thanksgiving, the family would gather for Thanksgiving dinner at the Brady house. And gather there again for Christmas eve dinner (followed by opening “early” Christmas presents). Later that same evening (usually about 9:00pm), Clarke's family would continue the Christmas eve celebrations at the home of his best friend, Neil Pruitt (a short distance away). This typically included a fireworks display at the Pruitt home (of which Clarke coordinated). On Christmas day, after opening presents from Santa Claus, Clarke would drive his family to celebrate a Christmas lunch with his parents and siblings in Lavonia, GA (a 30 minute drive).

During this time Clarke became a member of the “Toccoa Country Club” (where he was an avid golfer - often with Don Whitehead, Walt Daves & Dermon Harvey). Patt and Clarke would often play golf with Hugh & Patt Setzer. Patt Randall was a member of the “Ladies Golf Association” at “Toccoa Country Club” - a group of women who played golf every Tuesday. In fact, “Toccoa Country Club” was used for Richard Clarke Randall's marriage to Lee Ormond Wade on June 9, 1990.

After Ernest and Irene divorced, Irene continued to live in that house – across the street - operating a “beauty shop” from the lower level. And the family tradition continued for many years.

Clarke Randall was particularly active in the Jaycees where he served first as President of the Stephens County local Chapter, then Regional, and then Zone 2 President. During that time, the family would travel with Clarke to Perry, GA for the Jaycee state Board Meetings. At that time membership was limited to men up to age 35. However, an extension could (and was) granted to Clarke allowing him to serve one more year (because he was appointed chairman for the National convention being held in Georgia that following year). Upon “retiring” from the Jaycees, he was presented the “Exhausted Rooster Award” (literally a “mounted” white rooster standing on an inscribed wooden presentation stand) in 1970.

When a chapter of the Jaycettes was created in Stephens County (approx. 1968-1969), Patt immediately joined as an active member. Both Clarke and “Patt” continued to be active in the Jaycees as “non-members”. Clarke and “Patt” were also active when the Stephens County Jaycees hosted the Hawaii Jaycees attending the 1972 National Convention held in Atlanta, GA.

During 1972 the Georgia Jaycees (including Clarke and “Patt”) were extremely active in supporting Sam Nunn(D) in his bid for the U.S. Senate. After the election (about 1973), Gene Bishop (the Administrative Assistant for the Georgia 8th District U.S. Congressional Representative W.S. Stuckey, Jr.) invited Clarke Randall's family to stay at his home in Washington, D.C. and tour the Capitol.

Clarke was also an active member of the ”Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks“ (BPOE 1820 - Toccoa Lodge).

During the early '70s, Clarke went into partnership with Ernest Brady (his father-in-law) purchasing “Toccoa Industrial Sales”. Clarke was placed in charge of running the Industrial Sales Business.

During the 1973-1975 Clarke enjoyed “off-road” motorcycling (on a Yamaha 250cc trail bike) with Richard Randall (first on a Yamaha 90cc trail bike and later on a Yamaha 125cc trail bike) almost every weekend. They typically rode in the Yonah Dam area, up Panther creek, along the Tugaloo river area to the Tallulah Falls / Talulah Gorge area (often following old logging roads). Sometimes crossing over into South Carolina.

Shortly thereafter, Clarke went into partnership with Ernest Brady (his father-in-law) and Harry McDonald to purchase the manufacturing company, “Core Metal Products” (which was in foreclosure). The company was renamed “BMR Fabricators”. Later, Clarke and Ernest Brady had a disagreement which resulted in Clarke “firing” Earnest Brady from “BMR Fabricators”; who in turn “fired” Clarke from “Brady Welding, Co.”! Clarke made an offer to Earnest Brady to “buy out” his interest in “BMR Fabricators”. Brady refused. About a year later, Ernest Brady needed to borrow money for the business… but couldn't get a loan without Clarke's signature. Clarke refused to sign, so Ernest Brady made an offer to “buy out” Clarke's interest in “BMR Fabricators”. Clarke accepted the offer. “BMR Fabricators” was later sold and became “Gem Southeast”.

Clarke took a year “off” to re-assess his priorities and decide what his next career path should be. He then became President of ”Franklin Insurance Agency“ (for Mr. Shurett Whitworth - Secretary & Treasurer) in Lavonia, GA (in the Northeast Georgia Bank building). Clarke then worked with Mr. Shurett Whitworth to expand “Franklin Insurance Company” by acquiring competing insurance agencies in Toccoa, GA (which reduced Clarke's travel), Elberton, GA and Clarksville, GA. Clarke then became manager of the “Franklin Insurance Company” Toccoa office. Clarke worked for “Franklin Insurance Company” for 25 years, at which time he retired.

When returning from a trip to Saint Martin, Clarke and Patt decided to open “Toccoa Travel Agency”. This was to help offset their own love of travel. They traveled throughout the Caribbean; Jamaica (about 3 times a year for several years - typically for Valentines Day, July 4th and Halloween), Saint Martin, Antigua, BVIs, US Virgin Islands, Cancun Mexico, etc.

During 1994, Clarke (who had recently quit smoking cigarettes) was diagnosed with bladder cancer (a common cancer for smokers). His treatment involved surgery (in January 1995) followed by doctors injecting Typhoid (as a form of chemotherapy) directly into his bladder (as Typhoid had been proven to attack cancer cells). Of course this also required Clarke to then be treated for Typhoid. In some rare cases, the medication to treat Typhoid can cause a heart arrhythmia; which Clarke developed. With Clarke now cancer-free, he was left taking medication for the resulting heart arrhythmia.

Retirement

After retirement (approx. 1997), Clarke and Patt purchased an RV to travel across the U.S. (Sept. 1997), where they eventually settled for five years in Key West, FL (at 6700 Maloney Avenue, Key West, FL 33040). Unfortunately, the medication for his heart arrhythmia became ineffective, forcing him to have a heart pace-maker. Also, during their time in Key West, FL, Patt had begun developing some early symptoms associated with dementia. Clarke and Patt sold the RV and returned to Toccoa where they rented an apartment (at 18 Destination Drive, Toccoa, GA 30577, in a complex called “Andrew's Apartments”).

Soon after settling back in Toccoa, with her dementia worsening, Patt's condition was diagnosed as "Lewy Body Dementia". A short time later, Patt entered the Clary Care Center (at Stephens County Hospital) where she died on Sept. 28, 2006 (at age 68) from complications associated with Lewy Body Dementia.

“Patt” Brady (b. June 9, 1938 – d. Sept. 28, 2006)1), was the daughter of Ernest Lawton Brady (b. Aug. 8, 1918 – d. Sept. 3, 1987 at age 69)2) and Nettie Irene Simmons Brady (b. Aug. 29, 1915 – d. Aug. 13, 1999 at age 83 from complications associated with Alzheimer's disease)3).

“Patricia Brady Randall, June 9, 1938 – September 28, 2006, Wife of: W. Clarke Randall, Sons: Richard C. Randall, W. Mark Randall”)

Shortly after Patt's death, on January 30, 2007, Clarke bought 2 duplexes (at 143 Remsdale Street, Toccoa, GA). He lived in one unit while renting out the remaining three (to provide a supplemental retirement income). His new home was very near (within walking distance of) the Toccoa Elk's club (Lodge 1820), where he played cards (Gin) with his friends every weekday afternoon at 4:00pm. He often went to a gym in the morning and would, when timing and weather permitted, enjoy playing golf with his grand-daughter, Katie Grace Randall.

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Lineage

Name Line Manager Job Title Photo
Walter Clarke Randall
Walter Baxter “Dub” Randall Walter Clarke Randall (1912-1989) Father
Sara Ann Clarke Walter Clarke Randall Mother
William Farmer Clarke Sara Ann Clarke Grand Father
Gertrude Randall Sara Ann Clarke Grand Mother
Henry Oran Randall Gertrude Randall Great Grand Father
Julia Ann Sewell Gertrude Randall Great Grand Mother
David Sewell Julia Ann Sewell Great, Great Grand Father
Samuel Sewell David Sewell Great, Great, Great Grand Father
Susannah David Sewell Great, Great, Great Grand Mother
Joshua Sewell Samuel Sewell (1755-1837) Great, Great, Great, Great Grand Father
Jennie Willis Samuel Sewell (Ireland 1758-1812) Great, Great, Great, Great Grand Mother
Samuel Sewell Sr. Joshua Sewell (1715-1791) Great, Great, Great, Great, Great Grand Father
Christian Stevens Joshua Sewell Great, Great, Great, Great, Great Grand Mother
Caroline Martha Aderhold Julia Ann Sewell Great, Great Grand Mother
Issac M. Aderhold Caroline Martha Aderhold Great, Great, Great Grand Father
Sarah Stovall Caroline Martha Aderhold Great, Great, Great Grand Mother
Henry Beaman Randall Walter Baxter “Dub” Randall (1891-1949) Grand Father
Muriel Willene “Willie” Maret Walter Baxter “Dub” Randall (1891-1979) Grand Mother
Jesse Thomas Jackson Clarke William Farmer Clarke Great Grand Father
Sallie Tallulah Adams William Farmer Clarke Great Grand Mother
Thomas Watson Randall Henry Beaman Randall (1863-1926) Great Grand Father
Rutha Ella Farmer Henry Beaman Randall (1868-1938) Great Grand Mother
James M. Farmer Rutha Ella Farmer (1833/35-1915) Great, Great Grand Father
Elizabeth Harrison Rutha Ella Farmer (1837-1901) Great, Great Grand Mother
Elam Farmer James M. Farmer (1805-1857) Great, Great, Great Grand Father
Hepzibah “Hepsie” Harrison James M. Farmer (1813-1890) Great, Great, Great Grand Mother
Thomas J. Farmer Elam Farmer (1784–1877) Great, Great, Great, Great Grand Father
Oliver Harrison Elizabeth Harrison (1812-1856) Great, Great, Great Grand Father
Susan Stone Elizabeth Harrison (1813-1889) Great, Great, Great Grand Mother
Josiah Farmer Thomas J. Farmer VA (1744–1805) Great, Great, Great, Great, Great Grand Father
Sarah Jane Newton Thomas J. Farmer (1744–1831) Great, Great, Great, Great, Great Grand Mother - Christened at St. Matthew, Walsall, Stafford,England on Nov. 27, 1746
John Newton Sarah Jane Newton (1693–1775) Great, Great, Great, Great, Great, Great Grand Father
Jane Soper Sarah Jane Newton (1702–1747) Great, Great, Great, Great, Great, Great Grand Mother
Joseph William Maret Muriel Willene “Willie” Maret (1859-1940) Great Grand Father
Adela R. Walters Muriel Willene “Willie” Maret (1863-1937) Great Grand Mother
Anderson Smith Randal Thomas Watson Randall (1833-1875) Great, Great, Grand Father
Sophia Mitchell Thomas Watson Randall (1834-1900) Great, Great, Grand Mother
Meade Anderson Adams Sallie Tallulah Adams (1836-1902) Great, Great Grand Father
Sarah Ann Davis Sallie Tallulah Adams (1841-1888) Great, Great Grand Mother
Thomas W. Davis Sarah Ann Davis (1816-1894) Great, Great, Great, Grand Father
Sarah Kay Sarah Ann Davis (1820-1904) Great, Great, Great, Grand Mother
Jesse Adams Meade Anderson Adams (1812-1870) Great, Great, Great Grand Father
Lettice Christian Collier Meade Anderson Adams (1817-1917) Great, Great, Great Grand Mother
Joseph Maret Joseph William Maret (1824-1882) Great, Great, Grand Father
Isom Maret Joseph Maret (1792–1865) Great, Great, Great, Grand Father
Phoebie Walters Joseph Maret (1795-1861) Great, Great, Great, Grand Mother
Benjamin Maret Isom Maret (1750–1830) Great, Great, Great, Grand Father
Jodah “Judie” Harbin Isom Maret (1755–1830) Great, Great, Great, Grand Mother
John Christopher Harbin Jodah “Judie” Harbin (1711–1795) Great, Great, Great, Great, Grand Father
Elizabeth Ann Thomas Jodah “Judie” Harbin (1720–1815) Great, Great, Great, Great, Grand Mother
Sarah Ann Holland Joseph William Maret Great, Great, Grand Mother
Wiley Mitchell Sophia Mitchell (1802-1862) Great, Great, Great, Grand Father
Martha Patsy Wilkinson Sophia Mitchell (1804-1889) Great, Great, Great, Grand Mother
Elisha Wilkinson Martha Patsy Wilkinson (1762-1833) Great, Great, Great, Great, Grand Father
Lucy Abernathy Martha Patsy Wilkinson (1773-1837) Great, Great, Great, Great, Grand Mother
Signal T. Abernathy Lucy Abernathy (1752-1808) Great, Great, Great, Great, Great, Grand Father
Martha Holmes Lucy Abernathy (1750-1827) Great, Great, Great, Great, Great, Grand Mother
Thomas Wilkinson Elisha Wilkinson VA (1730-1777) Great, Great, Great, Great, Great, Grand Father
Sarah Porch Elisha Wilkinson VA (1731-1806) Great, Great, Great, Great, Great, Grand Mother
William Wilbur Mitchell, Jr. Wiley Mitchell (1772-1853) Great, Great, Great, Great, Grand Father
Catherine A. Moulder Wiley Mitchell (1778-1850) Great, Great, Great, Great, Grand Mother
William Wilbur Mitchell, Sr. William Wilbur Mitchell, Jr. (1748-1819) Great, Great, Great, Great, Great, Grand Father
Harriet Randolph William Wilbur Mitchell, Jr. (1742-1824) Great, Great, Great, Great, Great, Grand Mother
Robert Holland Sarah Ann Holland (1788-1869) Great, Great, Great, Grand Father
Jacob Holland Robert Holland (1750-1815) Great, Great, Great, Great, Grand Father
Mary Polly Harrison Robert Holland (1755-1815) Great, Great, Great, Great, Grand Mother
Sarah Jones Sarah Ann Holland (1830-1880) Great, Great, Great, Grand Mother
Lewis Jones Sarah Jones (1789-1869) Great, Great, Great, Great, Grand Father
Charity Jones Sarah Jones (1789-1853) Great, Great, Great, Great, Grand Mother
Oney Cypress Randal Anderson Smith Randal (1796-1854) Great, Great, Great, Grand Father
Susannah W. Wilkins Anderson Smith Randal (1800-1874) Great, Great, Great, Grand Mother
John Bull Oney Cypress Randal (1766-1851) Great, Great, Great, Great Grand Father
Charles Smith Wilkins Susannah W. Wilkins (1755-1817) Great, Great, Great, Great Grand Father
Elizabeth Puryear Susannah W. Wilkins (1775-1837) Great, Great, Great, Great Grand Mother
James Wilkins Charles Smith Wilkins Great, Great, Great, Great, Great Grand Father
Arabella Smith Marrow Charles Smith Wilkins Great, Great, Great, Great, Great Grand Mother
Seymour Puryear Elizabeth Puryear (1750-1788) Great, Great, Great, Great, Great Grand Father
Sarah Royster Elizabeth Puryear (1754-1803) Great, Great, Great, Great, Great Grand Mother
Hanna Harvey Oney Cypress Randal (1776-1852) Great, Great, Great, Great Grand Mother
Jacob Holland Robert Holland Great, Great, Great, Great, Grand Father
Mary Polly Harrison Robert Holland Great, Great, Great, Great, Grand Mother
Thomas Bull Jr. John Bull (1726-1797) Great, Great, Great, Great, Great Grand Father
Sarah Randal John Bull Great, Great, Great, Great, Great Grand Mother
Col. Thomas Peyton Harvey, Sr. Hanna Harvey (1740-1806) Great, Great, Great, Great, Great Grand Father
Sarahann Williams Hanna Harvey Great, Great, Great, Great, Great Grand Mother
Thomas Harrison Mary Polly Harrison (1730-1809) Great, Great, Great, Great, Great Grand Father
Catherine Caty Earle Mary Polly Harrison (1735–1802) Great, Great, Great, Great, Great, Grand Mother
John Baylis Earle Catherine Caty Earle Great, Great, Great, Great, Great, Great, Grand Father
Mary Catherine Caty Earle Great, Great, Great, Great, Great, Great, Grand Mother
Thomas Bull, Sr. Thomas Bull Jr. (1700-1763) Great, Great, Great, Great, Great, Great Grand Father
Susanna Harwell Thomas Bull Jr. Great, Great, Great, Great, Great, Great Grand Mother
John Harrison Thomas Harrison Great, Great, Great, Great, Great, Great Grand Father
Thomas Harrison (1665-1746)John Harrison Great, Great, Great, Great, Great, Great, Great Grand Father
Sarah Patsy Daniel Thomas Harrison Great, Great, Great, Great, Great, Great Grand Mother
Ambrose Harwell Susanna Harwell Great, Great, Great, Great, Great, Great, Great Grand Father
Elizabeth Browne Susanna Harwell Great, Great, Great, Great, Great, Great, Great Grand Mother
William Harvey Col. Thomas Peyton Harvey, Sr. (1713-1745) Great, Great, Great, Great, Great, Great Grand Father
Elizabeth Roebuck Col. Thomas Peyton Harvey, Sr. (1715-1745) Great, Great, Great, Great, Great, Great Grand Mother
Onesiphorus Harvey William Harvey (1677-1732) Great, Great, Great, Great, Great, Great, Great Grand Father
Dorothy Gaskins William Harvey (1678-1726) Great, Great, Great, Great, Great, Great, Great Grand Mother
Robert Roebuck Elizabeth Roebuck (1688-1750) Great, Great, Great, Great, Great, Great, Great Grand Father
Elizabeth Flowers Elizabeth Roebuck (1693-1751) Great, Great, Great, Great, Great, Great, Great Grand Mother
Robert Roebuck, Sr. Robert Roebuck (1653-1709) Great, Great, Great, Great, Great, Great, Great, Great Grand Father
Elizabeth Jones Robert Roebuck (1650-1751) Great, Great, Great, Great, Great, Great, Great, Great Grand Mother
Josias Gaskins Dorothy Gaskins Great, Great, Great, Great, Great, Great, Great, Great Grand Father
Dorothy Dameron Dorothy Gaskins Great, Great, Great, Great, Great, Great, Great, Great Grand Mother

Descendents of Thomas Harrison

Thomas Harrison was Muriel Willene “Willie” Maret's Great, Great, Great, Great, Great Grandfather.

Source: Descendants of Thomas Harrison

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Agatha Muriel Randall
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